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Frozen Donor Eggs Are As Efficient As Fresh, And Are More Cost Effective

October 16 , 2013
by: ASRM Office Public Affairs
Published in ASRM Press Release

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF FERTILITY SOCIETIES 21st WORLD CONGRESS ON FERTILITY AND STERILITY AND THE  69th ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE

For patients who need donated eggs to build their families, frozen donor eggs may be an excellent choice.  Researchers at Seattle Reproductive Medicine compared the outcomes of a year's fresh and frozen donor egg IVF cycles and found that clinical pregnancy rates are similar between fresh and frozen cycles, but that frozen cycles are more cost-effective, with a shorter time to cycle start and significantly lower cancellation rates.

From March 2012 to February 2013, outcomes for 113 fresh egg recipients were compared to those for 77 frozen recipients.  Clinical pregnancy rates were 60% for fresh cycles and 57% for frozen cycles. Cancellation rates differed quite a bit: only 1.2% of frozen cycles were cancelled, compared to 12% of fresh cycles. 

Costs were lower for patients who used frozen eggs.   The cost per transfer for frozen egg patients was $17,500 with an average cost of $30,532 per clinical pregnancy.  For patients using fresh eggs, the cost per transfer was $29,621 and the average cost per clinical pregnancy was $49,530.

In addition, using frozen eggs also resulted in a time savings for patients.  The average time from a patient's initial consult to the cycle start was 217 days for a fresh cycle and 172 for a frozen cycle. In the last six months of the study period, frozen egg cycles accounted for 61% of all donor egg cycles.

ASRM President, Linda Giudice, MD, PhD, observed, "Frozen egg banking is a promising development for patients and donors alike. Because the costs are lower and a shorter waiting time is involved, more patients are likely to find frozen donor eggs a very appealing alternative to fresh donor eggs."

O-348   Implementation and Cost-Effectiveness of Frozen Donor Eggs
LB Davis

 

Representing more than 50 fertility societies from around the globe, the International Federation of Fertility Societies (IFFS) is the world’s principal international fertility organization. The IFFS was founded in 1951, and held its first congress in New York in 1953. The IFFS mission is to stimulate basic and clinical research, disseminate education and encourage superior clinical care of patients in infertility and reproductive medicine. Website: http://www.iffs-reproduction.org/ 

The American Society for Reproductive Medicine, founded in 1944, is an organization of more than 7,000 physicians, researchers, nurses, technicians and other professionals dedicated to advancing knowledge and expertise in reproductive biology.  Affiliated societies include the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology, the Society for Male Reproduction and Urology, the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, the Society of Reproductive Surgeons and the Society of Reproductive Biologists and Technologists.


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